Medicine & USMLE

Naltrexone

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Neuro Drugs
  1. Levodopa, Carbidopa
  2. Levetiracetam
  3. Valproic Acid
  4. Anticholinergic Syndrome
  5. Cholinergic Crisis
  6. Benztropine / Trihexyphenidyl
  7. Lidocaine
  8. Pyridostigmine, Neostigmine, Edrophonium
  9. Naltrexone
  10. Pregabalin
  11. Scopolamine
  12. Phenytoin
  13. Ethosuximide
  14. Succinylcholine
  15. Opioids
  16. Memantine
  17. Halothane / Flurane
  18. Donepezil
  19. Propofol
  20. Ergotamine
  21. Triptans
  22. Selegiline / Rasagiline
  23. Entacapone / Tolcapone
  24. Gabapentin
  25. Lamotrigine
  26. Carbamazepine
  27. Ramelteon

Summary

Naltrexone is a medication given to help treat opioid and alcohol dependence. Since it works slowly and has long-lasting effects, it cannot be used to treat acute intoxication. Instead, it is better used to help patients slowly recover from opioid and alcohol addiction.

Key Points

  • Naltrexone (Vivitrol, ReVia)
    • Mechanism
      • Binds to the mu receptors, thus preventing narcotics from binding to the receptor site
      • Mechanism is similar to naloxone, but effects are longer-lasting and it works slowly
      • Administered orally
    • Clinical use
      • Opioid and alcohol dependence
        • To help recover from opioid or alcohol addiction
        • By blocking the opioid receptors, naltrexone has been shown to reduce craving, aiding in the ability to quit
    • Side Effects and Adverse Reactions
      • Dizziness
      • Headaches
      • Insomnia
      • Anxiety
      • Anorexia